Indiana mayors want prescriptions required for meds often used to make...

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 Posted 3/6/2013 3:22:29 PM
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3/6/2013 12:00:00 AM
Indiana mayors want prescriptions required for meds often used to make meth
Indiana mayors want prescriptions required for meds often used to make meth
Post #211009
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 Posted 3/6/2013 4:27:39 PM
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the problem with Rep. Yoder's amendment to his original bill, now law, is that smurfers, those who buy as agents for the mfgrs', can still go to convenience stores and not be tracked.

As the mayors and cops say, the superior route is to make the precursors by prescription ONLY.  This will stop production in its tracks, like OR and MS have already accomplished.  Just ask the Sheriff of Lane Co., OR.  

So, don't whine that cold remedy users will be "inconvenienced".  So, what.  Would you rather stop meth lab explosions, or make someone wait until  morning to get that prescription.  I bet that Dr. Feldman, MD, is under the influence of drug companies, who are making multi-millions of dollars per year under the current situation.
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 Posted 3/6/2013 5:13:52 PM
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jclehman50 (3/6/2013)
the problem with Rep. Yoder's amendment to his original bill, now law, is that smurfers, those who buy as agents for the mfgrs', can still go to convenience stores and not be tracked.

As the mayors and cops say, the superior route is to make the precursors by prescription ONLY.  This will stop production in its tracks, like OR and MS have already accomplished.  Just ask the Sheriff of Lane Co., OR.  .


The RX law in Or may not have had much of an affect.

Executive Summary

The manufacture and abuse of theillegal and addictive

drug methamphetamine is a scourgethat has been

tearing at countless families andcommunities across the

United States for more than adecade. Oregon has been

particularly hard hit by thisepidemic. In 2004, Oregon

became only the second state to pullpseudoephedrine

from retail shelves and put it behindthe counter. This

law was specifically intended tocurtail the manufacture

of methamphetamine, for whichpseudoephedrine

is used as a chemical precursor.Then in 2005, the

State of Oregon passed a law (HB2485, effective

September 2006) further restrictingaccess to medicines

containing pseudoephedrine by makingthem available

via prescription only (hereinafter“Rx-only”).

1

Oregon

was the first state to pass such alaw, and so far only

Mississippi has passed a similarRx-only law.

In this paper we review theobservable patterns in

methamphetamine manufacturing andabuse in Oregon

in comparison with other regionsthat did not adopt

similar Rx-only laws. Our review andanalysis show

that Oregon’s experience withmethamphetamine

manufacture and abuse since 2006does not stand out

from its neighbors or other parts ofthe United States.

This potentially calls into questionwhether Oregon’s

Rx-only law had any independenteffect on these key

measures. Moreover, this law doescome at some cost

to consumers and government andprivate payers. In

particular we find:

• The number of methamphetamine

lab incidents (a commonly usedindicator of

methamphetamine manufacturing) inOregon declined

significantly from 467 in 2004 to 12in 2010 – a

decline of more than 90%. Examinedin isolation,

therefore, it might appear that theRx-only law may

have had its intended effect onmethamphetamine

manufacture. However, most of thisdecline occurred

before the Rx-only law becameeffective in 2006, by

which time the number of incidentsalready had fallen

to 50, which strongly suggests thatother factors are

driving this trend.

• However, a similar regional trendis also

evident in neighboring states thatdo not require a

prescription for pseudoephedrine.For example, the

number of methamphetamine labincidents in the state

of Washington declined by more than90% between

2004 and 2010, as well. In fact, by2010 the number of

methamphetamine incidents permillion of population

was comparable in Oregon,Washington, and California.

Statistical analysis confirms that,after accounting for

regional trends in methamphetaminelab incidents, little

distinguishes Oregon fromneighboring states that did

not adopt Rx-only laws forpseudoephedrine. The exact

mechanism behind this shared declineis not known but

would appear to reflecttechnological or market changes

unrelated to the Oregon law.


http://cascadepolicy.org/pdf/pub/Oregon_Meth_Law.pdf




Edited: 3/6/2013 5:18:16 PM by truthuser
Post #211020
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 Posted 3/6/2013 6:25:14 PM
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In OR and MS, the 2 states where prescriptions are required, in the past several years, the annual number of meth labs discovered was around 10.

Of course, the problem of imported meth, from MX, or other states continues.  It would be better to make a federal law, applying to EVERY state.  MX has made it illegal to import the precursors.  There are around 12 factories (in China/India), who are glad to cooperate and not export to MX.  

"Shorty" Guzman (El Chapo), number 1 on the FBI list, who has the government of MX in his pocket, simply sets up his crack factories in places like AZ, where his smurfs can buy "sleeping pills" (Sudafed) to their hearts content, and make it as pure as driven snow (but very deadly).
Post #211029
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 Posted 3/6/2013 7:11:31 PM
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Awful idea. This is a war against everyone with allergies.
Post #211033
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 Posted 3/7/2013 12:19:24 AM
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jclehman50 (3/6/2013)
 ....I bet that Dr. Feldman, MD, is under the influence of drug companies, who are making multi-millions of dollars per year under the current situation.


Having read the above paragraph in your post I wondered what could have been attributed to DR Feldman which compelled you to make such scathing statement. From the article I found "Dr. Richard Feldman, an Indiana State Medical Association board member, told the House committee that an estimated 450,000 Indiana residents legitimately use pseudoephedrine each year and that the proposed stricter limits were a more reasonable step than requiring prescriptions.

“Prescriptions will result in increased costs to patients by doctor visits, child care while they’re at the doctor, time away from work and the higher cost of prescription drugs,” said Feldman, who was state health commissioner under former Democratic Gov. Frank O’Bannon"

Which to me appears factual and accurate. What part of his statement did you disagree with?
Post #211036
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 Posted 3/7/2013 12:35:08 AM
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AreYouKiddingMe (3/6/2013)
So now it will require a doctor visit and associated costs to get common cold and allergy medicine? And prices are sure to go up now that a pharmacist has to fill the prescription. Not to mention these medicines will be covered under Obamacare since they're prescriptions. Excuse me if I don't jump on this band wagon. 


Enough said boys and girls. 

Oh, and won't we all feel silly when we make an appointment with our physician so as to obtain a prescription for bath salts.

Just sayin'.


Edited: 3/7/2013 12:38:04 AM by sarowe
Post #211039
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 Posted 3/7/2013 1:45:32 AM
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This is nothing more than politicians on a power trip.  Often Oregon’s law is cited as an example why cold medicine should be made a prescription drug to combat the meth lab problem. 

The problem with citing the law is the number of meth labs had gone down dramatically before the law was passed. 

One day a talk show I was listening to the topic was the meth lab problem.  A person from Oregon which I believe was a law enforcement officer called in and said the reason the meth lab numbers decreased was the cost of ingredients.  As it turns out the ingredients in the cold medicine was expensive so the meth makers started getting the ingredients in larger quantity and cheaper directly from Mexico.  The result was a decrease in the number of labs but the labs were larger and the total production stayed steady.

If anyone thinks if this law is passed other drugs are not going to have the same restrictions is kidding themselves.  Already a state lawmaker in another state has proposed the same restrictions on over the counter pain killers.

Any law that makes a criminal out of someone when they never intended to violate a law should not be enacted.  This law is just such a law.  Just like the federal law that restricted the number of incandescent light bulbs a person could purchase at a time.  Fortunately the law was suspended a few years ago.
Post #211048
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 Posted 3/7/2013 4:12:12 AM
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jclehman50 (3/6/2013)
the problem with Rep. Yoder's amendment to his original bill, now law, is that smurfers, those who buy as agents for the mfgrs', can still go to convenience stores and not be tracked.

As the mayors and cops say, the superior route is to make the precursors by prescription ONLY.  This will stop production in its tracks, like OR and MS have already accomplished.  Just ask the Sheriff of Lane Co., OR.  

So, don't whine that cold remedy users will be "inconvenienced".  So, what.  Would you rather stop meth lab explosions, or make someone wait until  morning to get that prescription.  I bet that Dr. Feldman, MD, is under the influence of drug companies, who are making multi-millions of dollars per year under the current situation.



Typical lefty comments, lets punish the 99.99% of people who aren't doing anything wrong because of the 0.01% who ARE. I have a better idea, let the methheads blow themselves up! Make running a methlab a more severe crime, how about a class A felony with 10 years minimum sentencing?

Or is that too "harsh" and you'd rather just treat the law abiding citizens like garbage (again).
Post #211070
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 Posted 3/7/2013 4:34:49 AM
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Drop the restrictions and let the meth heads kill themselves off. 
Post #211073
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